Tradition Continues: United Methodist Women of Tuckaleechee to Host Fall Festival | Community


A decades-long tradition that had to be put on hold in 2020 due to COVID-19 returns to Tuckaleechee United Methodist Church in Townsend on Thursday, October 21.

The Tuckaleechee United Methodist Women’s Fall Festival, the group’s main fundraiser for mission projects, includes a meal, bake sale, and craft fair. Meals will be served from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and the craft fair and bake sale will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Masks are not mandatory but will be available to those who wish, and social distancing is encouraged.

There will be a slight change in the meals. Rather than having a sit-down meal in the church communion hall as in the past, barbecue sandwiches and all fixings will be packaged for take out only due to COVID-19 precautions.

UMW President Danita Goddard said: “If it’s nice, we’ll put tables outside if people want to sit and stand back and eat here. There will be no meals inside this time.

The meal will include a choice of a barbecue pork or chicken sandwich as well as fries, a house coleslaw, a drink and a dessert, all at a cost of $ 10. “We will always have our world famous homemade cobblers,” Goddard said with a chuckle. Guests will choose between the mouth-watering apple or peach cobbler prepared by the church’s talented cooks.

Sale of pastries, crafts

The Pastry Sale features homemade baked goods, jams, jellies, apple butter, pickles and more that can be purchased to take home or as a gift.

UMW member Sara Hatch said: “There is a mixture of bean soup, spicy tea, lots of cookies, candy, cakes and pies.” Additionally, Bonnie McCampbell’s French Fries Pies, another Tuckaleechee Fall Festival tradition, will be available.

If you have a particular item close to your heart, make sure you get to the festival early. Jellies, apple butter, and pickles, in particular, sell out quickly.

The Craft Sale will feature a wide variety of reasonably priced craft items ready for first-time Christmas shoppers. A small sample of these include seasonal decorations for fall and Christmas created by UMW members and others, as well as the popular painted river rocks by Mary Lynn Morgan, wooden pieces by the accomplished carpenter Bob Tiebout and decorations made from wine corks by Hatch.

“I have everyone in the universe who collects wine corks! Hatch said. Wine corks are tied together in the shape of fall pumpkins, Christmas trees, hearts, etc., then painted to add detail. “I’m working on a snowman right now, but I didn’t quite get it,” she added.

Two handicrafts will also be drawn. There is a quilt and two matching pillows made and donated by outgoing UMW President Vickie Mueller. The pattern is called Labyrinth and is done in shades of blue. In addition, a small table offered by Tiebout will be drawn. Tickets cost $ 5 each, or you can purchase five tickets for $ 20. Goddard said, “You can get them in advance, but they will also be available on the day of the festival. We won’t do the drawing until the next day.

Missions benefits

Taffy King said all funds from this fundraiser and others, after expenses are paid, are used for mission projects locally – including the Wesley Foundation, Haven House, Pregnancy Resource Center, Habitat for Humanity, Wears Valley Ranch, Second Harvest Food Bank and Holston Home for Children – as well as national and international missions, such as Samaritan’s Purse and UMCOR, United Methodist Committee on Relief.

Not being able to organize the Fall Festival last year greatly affected the amount of donations usually made by Tuckaleechee UMW. Goddard said: “It was very difficult last year when we didn’t have the money to write the checks like we usually did. This is our main fundraiser… There were missions we sent $ 1000 to and we only sent $ 100 last year. Some did not receive anything. I think we were even more motivated this year to make sure we could have the festival.

Tuckaleechee United Methodist Church is located at 7322 Old Tuckaleechee Road, Townsend. Richard Rudesill is a pastor.


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